Ep. 257 Slow down with Kerri Burchill

reimagining-success-with-kerri-burchill

In this week’s episode, Anna speaks to Kerri Burchill in the latest in her interview series.


In this week’s episode, Anna speaks to Kerri Burchill in the latest in her interview series.

In 2006, Kerri and her life partner felt that their world was a little too comfortable, so they carved a new path that took them from Canada to the Caribbean, then to NYC, Detroit, Baltimore, rural Illinois and now San Antonio. Along that journey, Kerri completed her PhD and her executive coaching certificate.

Without question, those life and work experiences shape Kerri’s work today. In that journey, Kerri saw how structures drive behavior. Her consulting work helps companies create structures that foster communication, trust, accountability and achieve results, which help leaders lead out of the ASKhole trap and feel fabulous about their work.

Tune in to hear our conversation.

You can connect with Kerri on her Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Instagram.

*Resources mentioned during the episode*

The Outsiders Business Incubator – A year-long business incubator for experienced corporate professionals who want to translate their skills and passions into a profitable and fulfilling business. onestepoutside.com/9to5

Slow Down

Anna Lundberg  

Hello, everyone, and welcome to our latest interview. I’m here with Kerri Burchill, who’s coming to us live from Texas where the weather I hear is rather warmer than it is here in the UK. Welcome, Kerri. And thanks so much for your time today.

 

Kerri Burchill  

My pleasure and great to be here.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Well, first, my question is always: Can you tell us what you were doing in your previous life and career? And what are you doing today?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, great question. So the, the skinny version is that my partner and I, in our 30s felt like our life was a little too comfortable. I do not have the ability to have kids. And so with that comes, obviously some disappointment and some freedom. And so I applied for a principalship because I was in education at the time, I applied for a principalship in a NATO base in the Netherlands. And he applied for med school. And he just kind of said, like, let’s roll with whatever happens. So the long story short is I did not get the job. He started med school at 39. And that took us from Canada, where we lived into New York City, Detroit, Baltimore. And then we ended up starting to practice, we did med school, and we started to practice in Southern Illinois, which is a rural setting, not a great fit. But that transition took me out of healthcare did health care, or not sorry, I did education all the way through med school, and then transitioned into health care, because he said to the the new hospitals where he was working, I’m not signing a contract with you unless you find meaningful employment for my partner, because of course, we’d moved to the States, I didn’t have a green card, yet visas were an issue. And I’m like, Oh, stop, like we’re broke, I’ll find something. Anyway, so a healthcare company hired me and I was their only organizational development leader. And that really transitioned me into corporate but then I find I found myself so frustrated with just the pace of change and the openness of the organization. And really, in some ways, just a misalignment with some of the values that we ended up moving to Texas. And I just said, You know what I’m going to, I’m going to try this entrepreneur thing 100% on my own and lean into it. And so I’ve been on my own for a couple of years, I incorporated in 2018. But I’ve been on my own for two years. And man, I wish I did it sooner. Ah, yeah.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Love it. And I have to say, so coming back to your 30s The Epiphany, I suppose what what what can you dig into that a little bit more? What What was it that made you both realize together?

 

Kerri Burchill  

We really, yeah, my sister says like, she was actually traveling for work and was staying at her house. And she remembers being there for the initial conversation in the kitchen. And our conversation really, Anna was just saying, like, I don’t, I don’t want to be this comfortable, because we aren’t getting back in ways that we felt we could kind of that social responsibility. So again, that not having kids thing. We have some freedoms. And with that, I think in my perspective, anyway, some responsibility to sort of given helping contribute however that looks. And so we just didn’t want to hit the ceiling, which we anticipated really, by the end of our 30s. I’d be a principal, maybe an area director could be a superintendent by my 40s. Like it just and what difference was that being an administrator at that level versus I was assistant principal at the time? Just, where’s the GiveBack? Right, where was the opportunity to really help others thrive? And so that was the that was the stirring in our belly that had us change things up.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love it. It sounds very generous and selfless. And a lot of us make these decisions, although we all say and every coach has I want to help people, I think, certainly for me, it was a very selfish decision to quit my job and start my own business. So it’s really beautiful to hear you know that you were really thinking about that that responsibility, as you said, to give back. How did you Sorry, go ahead.

 

Kerri Burchill  

No, that’s just the joy. Right? That’s the joy of the work is the giving back.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love it. And I see, see and you that that’s that’s true. And that’s what you mean. So I guess how did you come up with the exact way in which you could give back it sounded like it was quite organic in terms of your husband’s work and moving and so on. How have you arrived? where you are today in terms of what you’re doing now, people?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Well, the real grind was for me when I was in that healthcare role where I wanted to help people and I was I was serving the leaders. I had started a Leadership Academy doing some leadership development. But there was this there was this grind between what the leaders wanted to do and what the organization was ready to do this disconnect. And despite everyone’s best, best efforts, that the group of leaders in tandem with the organization could just not get in sync and I found myself more and more frustrated with that disconnect. And so I incorporated because I knew that I needed to be in front of organizations and leaders that were ready to get in synchrony. Get in sync and that showed me that I had something that I could help people with more than just a traditional nine to five sort of environment where you’re fitting and trying to navigate some of those politics or hidden agendas or whatever the things were that I was bumping up in healthcare. And then when I incorporated and just did a little bit on the side, I saw that I could be invited to work and serve with people that were ready to do the work, the vulnerability, the the deep digging, the questioning, old practices, the unlearning. And I found the negative cloud that I had sort of over my head in the healthcare setting, frustrated with the disconnect, where I didn’t feel like I was having the impact that I wanted to have, when I did the lip gigs on the side, I’m like, Oh, this is so much fun. This is, this is the right work, I can sort of peel off some of that, the corporate stuff that is so weighty. And so that that helped me see where people wanted to thrive what I could do to sort of align with their work, and then it just got momentum from there.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love that. And for those listening, I think we’re talking a lot of them running as we record this and niching workshop this week. And I think we talk a lot about where to focus. And so and and unfortunately, I think we make it really difficult for ourselves, going after people who don’t want to be helped. They don’t know they have a problem. If they do, they don’t want a solution. They can’t pay for this, you know. So I love that idea of actually going where there’s energy. And it reminds me of when I was in my final corporate marketing role. I was in digital marketing. And I thought naively, as an ambassador for digital, I wanted to deploy it to everybody, and everybody should invest, and everybody should do all these things. And of course, that wasn’t the case. And what I realized was more effective was to find the people who were forward thinking and pioneering enough to recognize that this is an incredible opportunity, partner with them do amazing things. And then everybody else saw Oh, wow, that’s a good case study, we should probably do that too. And then it rolls out. So I think it’s an important insight for people choosing where to focus on their business that please go where people need you and want to and again, it’s it’s selfless, because they want to be helped. But it’s also selfish, because you’re, you’re actually enjoying it, because you said you’re getting the joy and the fulfillment and making the impact you want to make.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, yeah, and I don’t know what your philosophy is on niching. I know that I joined a marketing group, when I sort of first went out on my, on my own because I found myself what I call shotgunning. Like I was doing a bunch of everything and nothing really grabbing and they’re kind of promotion around niching was to get super narrow, and I just found myself that was like square peg round hole. And really to just say, I think my tagline now is something like I help leaders and teams in Messy dynamic situations, to slow down to go fast and achieve their ambitious goals. And so when you think of messy, dynamic situations, that itself is a niche, but I have I have, you know, police departments and manufacturing teams and healthcare and HR and my niche is not very niched, if you think of industry, but gosh, it is with those leaders that are finding themselves in a messy dynamic situation. So it’s interesting that

 

Anna Lundberg  

it’s really common that we don’t if we’re you know, I like to think of as as sort of as a renaissance woman, and we’re multi potentialize, multi passionate, whatever. And, and I actually believe it’s the strength and one of the reasons why, you know, as a solopreneur, we can exactly do that. Because if we had a business, where we had teams of people going out, of course, they need to know, this is the kind of organization you’re going to contact them. And this is, you know, the steps you need to follow. But the beauty of you being you is that you can you know what messy organizations means, you know, which interactions give you joy, right? So you can absolutely, that is 100% niche enough. And you also have a niche in terms of the solution you’re bringing and the problems you’re helping them with, right. So it’s not just okay to work with corporates, this size company, and I did it. And actually, yeah, it’s much more nuanced than that, but also very clear to you, who you want to work with, and if it’s right or wrong, and I think often we just, we don’t trust our intuition. And never have I gone Oh, I wish I hadn’t listened to my intuition. Because I always regret if I think, Oh, this isn’t gonna be great. And I go with that client, it’s inevitably not a good relationship. And it’s something I sort of come to resent, unfortunately happens much less these days. And yet, when you feel wow, yes, these these people get me and this is, you know, there’s an amazing collaboration to be held to such a different feeling.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah. And that was me in the corporate world, right, I could see those problems, and I would push or pull people in, or then I’d support people that were in their own way trying to push things forward. And it was just this constant, like bumping up against a wall. And so yeah, it’s good case in point.

 

Anna Lundberg  

And it sounds I mean, it sounds very mature and wise and pragmatic and easy when you describe it. So I wonder what challenges have you come up against across the way did you ever doubt Oh, my goodness, can I do this on my own? And, you know, what were some of the hurdles along the way? Yeah,

 

Kerri Burchill  

gosh, the imposter syndrome. I was just telling someone this story the other day. So the first time I went live on Facebook, you know, we had the whole house quiet. My husband has the dog in a different room like Every variable is managed. And I finished and I and I’m so proud of myself, right. And of course, like terrible backdrop, I look at these videos that I still have up just just to evidence, my growth. But I come out of the room and I’m like, handsome. That’s what I call my husband, handsome. What did you think? And he’s like, Oh, I didn’t listen to it. And I was just so pissed off, frankly. And really, what what I learned is that he sees myself like, I need to see me. But it’s the imposter syndrome. Like he already knows that I would have been great online, he didn’t need to watch that. And so sometimes fighting that impostor syndrome, I try to see myself through other people’s eyes that that see me and believe in me, and, and that’s kind of my strategy to combat some of that. This year, I’ve done 13 keynotes, and it’s just at the end of this 13th one that I am allowing myself to own my style. And I think when you try to try to fit in a mold of what you think things should be like, or you’re trying to be someone that you emulate, or that you really like admire, and then try to be like them emulate their style, then it’s just this inauthenticity that kind of happens. And you get in your head, like, I think that just fuels that imposter beast. So I’ve definitely struggled with that. So my strategies are to see myself through someone else’s eyes, and then just give myself permission to be me, like in a keynote with hundreds of people. I’m pulling the audience, I’m walking around the tables, I’m very informal. I’m not your polished like comedian on the stage. And just instead of trying to be that person just going no, this is my style and appreciating that that’s going to align for some conferences and snot brothers, and that’s okay.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love that so much. And I think it’s so easy to, especially when we’re starting out, we’re looking to other experts and gurus and then with all of this is the model, we have to copy. That’s the business model. But also, oh, this is how you need to do your reels on Instagram. And this is how you need to post on LinkedIn. And we’re constantly looking for the answer of how to do it. And actually, again, super reassuring, empowering, there is no right answer. The right answer is whatever you want to do feels good to you gets you the result that you want.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, yeah. And you know, 100% of my business has been referral, like none of it has come from social media or other things. Now, people do stalk me on social media to make sure that I’m legit, or they’ll check out my website, they’ll do other things, but there’s some sort of referral or they’ve met me in person, which is like the counter opposite of what the imposter should. Like, it’s the antidote to the imposter thing is just that fact that 100% of the, of the business has been on referral. So, impostor go away, like, I’m not trying to be anybody else, they want to work with me. You know, it’s, it’s, it’s me that they want, it’s not me trying to be someone else. They don’t, they’re not, they don’t want the other thing that I could be they want me. And so just really doing some head talk, you know, I’ve got a coach and accountability group that just helped me stay grounded. But there are times when I’m leaning into, like, new work, and I’m going, you know, I don’t know if this is me, I don’t know if I can do this. And then of course, my husband will, will just like, give your head to shake, right? Or other people will just chunk it down where I can sort of manage that head talk.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love them to have a supportive partner is so so valuable. And it’s someone who believes in you and as you said, doesn’t have to be my classic. Like, if you say, Do I look fat, and this, they don’t need to look at you like Nope.

 

Anna Lundberg  

But that’s it’s funny, again, the how that the serendipitous world is that I just spoke to someone earlier today, he also said, everything comes from referral, and so on, but as you said, the reassurance I’m gonna get to a social proof sort of thing of going on to seeing like, okay, I can see she’s posted on LinkedIn, and articles, and so on. And of course, it’s still a good way to get in front of people. And it’s an important reminder to you, and I’m glad to hear that you say that, that, of course, if people want to work with you again, and they’ve heard you that’s the biggest. That’s sort of the Net Promoter Score kind of Dreamland of every business. Right? If other people are recommending that means that you certainly do have a clear enough niche because they’ve clearly communicated your value. And it means that you’re doing a really good job. So really important reminder, I think, man, yeah. And so, funnily enough, yeah, you mentioned the speaking and we talked offline, before we start recording, you said, oh, you know, he’s 17, or whatever was keynote just fell into my lap. So it’s very easy. But so in terms of the business model, was it you’re doing, you’re speaking you’re you’re training, what would you say sort of Who do you work with? What do you do?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, yeah. So I would say 50% of my work is leadership development. And 25 is this new speaking thing that wasn’t even on my website before I got asked to do the first keynote. And 25% is coaching. So I do a lot of stuff online. I probably the keynotes, recently have had me traveling a little more than I want to, but I probably go on site for the organizations I serve maybe once every two months on average. So there’s not a lot of travel which is great. I’d rather do everything 100% online. There’s some value to being in personnel something That’s

 

Anna Lundberg  

nice. And so I suppose during the last few years, you were doing a lot of online, I imagine and now it sort of come back into in person, or how’s it been looking for you?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah. So some of my, like, my first business client was in the rural southern Illinois area, and they’re still my client. In fact, I’ve been trying to graduate them, like, you’ve got this, it’s been, you know, five, six years, you know, the skills, I can help your teacher, your leaders, you know, teach sort of incoming employees, but you’ve got this. And then they came back and asked me to do company wide training, that they, you know, had a bit of financial impact from COVID, who hasn’t. And except for Amazon, who hasn’t had that financial impact. And so they said, you know, we need to, you know, sort of cut back the consulting with you. And I said, Good, like, I’ve been trying to graduate you from me for years. And then they came back like a month later and said, actually, when we asked our team, the most valuable work, supporting them, it was Carrie Burchill, so please come and do company wide training. So that’s, you know, that’s like first companies from the beginning in Southern Illinois, and some of those clients have stayed in that area. And we’ve just transitioned to do stuff online instead of me doing it in person. And then their network has sort of brought about other networks. So I think initially, my first clients were in person, because they met me doing day to day business stuff in the area. And now like, now, I live in San Antonio, I don’t have a San Antonio client, which kills me. I’m just like, desperate to have my backyard clientele, but I’m networking like a fiend. When I’ve done some Texas keynotes, I’m like vulnerably, saying, like, I want business in my backyard, Antonio. So I think there was something around networking in person in the area where I lived, and then that sort of caught a little bit of fire, and it grew from there. So I think that was the starting point. Because Because now that I’ve moved, I’m having a hard time. Like cracking into that here.

 

Anna Lundberg  

And that’s the one thing about referral, I think we don’t quite have the control over when people refer and how much and to whom, and so on. So I think when we do want a particular direction of the business, either into a new niche or geography and so on, obviously, it helps to have a bit more of a systematic approach to go, Okay, this is what I need to send that out into the universe and say, Hey, I’m here, San Antonio. I think I went to San Antonio, to go to the Six Flags. Is there six flags in San Antonio, if there is my office and plane outside Dallas? I spent quite a few trips there as though so I love it. I hope it wasn’t in the summer months, because it’s thinking hot right now. Yes. I mean, the contrast between the heat outside and the freezing cold aircon in the shops in the malls and everything. I always confused me, but I didn’t know

 

Kerri Burchill  

that me to Why yes, internationally. I see every every country doing that doesn’t make sense to me either.

 

Anna Lundberg  

But I imagined we don’t really have act on it. Not that we need it. But perhaps with climate change we will do in the future. Because when it does get hot here, we’re all very much so you know, we’re in trouble. So I think the game. Yeah. But coming into sort of personal brand things. I know you talk about referrals, but you are obviously on LinkedIn, Instagram, I just saw a couple of your posts. And you talk about sort of not really having a niche, but we do have a niche. So what what do you why people recommending you what what is it you’re doing? Like what what do you stand for? I suppose what is this contribution that you wanted to make? What are you giving back?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, so you know, when you think about messy, dynamic situations, I really am about helping people slow down, to figure it out. So I believe the answers in the room, like leaders are the best ones to decide what they need to do moving forward because they’re in the trench. So my analogy is, you know, if I wake up in the morning, and I might feel really sick, and I say to my partner, oh, I don’t feel that good. And he says, are you gonna go to work? I’m like, Yeah, I’m gonna go to work. And then again, at work, and I’m like, Oh, my gosh, I need some medicine. So I go to a walk in clinic, of course, can’t get a same day doctor appointment, and all of a sudden, to this stranger. I’m like describing what’s happening with my body when I’m coughing up all this detail that I would not share with my partner, right? And so, in those messy situations, we tend to hide the real truth from people. But if you go see someone from the outside, you just bear it. All. Right. And so that’s, that’s sort of my analogy, and I help people slow down to put words on what is working, what’s not working, what do we need to address and kind of help facilitate the slowing down work so that we can go fast and achieve those big results. So I was have a have a plant that I’m working with, and they just got a new plant manager and so they were doing the transition between leaders of continuing to work with me. And I said to the new leader, that the old leaders invites on on our coaching time said like, slow down time with Kerry and the new leaders like oh, yeah, I need that slow downtime, like wow, it’s you know, really crazy. And so I help people slow down and just figure out their own answers because they do know they’re in the trench, but in the in the fast pace speeding, they, you know, just don’t don’t really get to what answers are So they just do like Band Aid fixes, and then it’s this unsustainable issue, fix issue, fix issue fixing. So,

 

Anna Lundberg  

I mean, that’s a powerful insight for not just organizations, but all of us. Right. So again, I was just sharing with someone now with, with whatever with business with work, we’re doing up a house and all sorts of very little time, especially from, for myself initiative by myself to slow down and go, Oh, what is the big picture here? How shall I want to be? And those are questions that I’m not getting asked, let alone answered right now. Right. So to have someone external, come in and get Okay. Dedicated, slow downtime? What are you actually working towards? You know, who are you with all these questions? I think that’s very parallel with the kind of work I do with clients and in a different sense, but it’s something I think we all really need.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, yeah. And I see honestly, like post COVID that people are trying to do what work before COVID even faster now. And just just kind of calling out that, like, where’s the space for innovation? Where’s the slowdown to kind of acknowledge what are the pain points? And what do we need to recognize some of that? So yeah.

 

Anna Lundberg  

And this is, I’m very passionate about redefining productivity. And it’s one of those things as you said, after COVID, you know, what, is this really what we want from our people, it’s certainly not what we as employees want just to do things faster. And, and now with the advent of AI, which is obviously accelerating very quickly, as well. There is an opportunity, I think, to really rethink how we’re doing work and how we’re engaging employees, organizations, as leaders, and so on. So it’s sort of a time of turmoil, but also really exciting to see. And hopefully we can play a small part in that in that revolution.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yes, I would love to have a little ripple effect. Absolutely. Yeah,

 

Anna Lundberg  

absolutely. And so in practical terms, and I know you said you’re traveling a little bit more than you’d like to at the moment. And you’re taking some time off in January, you said, but what does sort of how many days a week you working? How do you like to kind of plan your work? Are you very organized and schedule driven? Are you flexible? Talk us through some of your ways of working? Yeah,

 

Kerri Burchill  

absolutely. So my partner’s schedule, he works 11 days on and then gets a long weekend. So every other weekend, I try to take the Friday off, I wake up in the morning without an alarm, such a gift, and do a little bit of like, I’ll wake up and just have like a cup of tea and do my morning routine. And then walk the dogs in my first meetings at nine. And then sometimes I have, you know, hours and hours of meetings a day today, like it’s you. And then I have some at five tonight. So I have this big break during the day. So I’ll block that off when it just naturally happens and dive into a book that I’m writing. Sometimes I’ll block time just to be able to work on PowerPoints that I’m building for different leadership teams or do some of that thing work. But in general, I’ll travel like once every two months for maybe three to five days. And other than that, I’m just like I have pretty wide open calendar, I say to people like access me all the time. Like if you text me call if I’m available. I’ll take it so I’m I’m I’m comfortable Switching gears, you know, jumping from frying pan to the fire to this to that. But I am protective of nothing starts until nine and I try to wrap up my day at five. Literally your motto, your mantra, right nine to five, get out of that. But yeah,

 

Anna Lundberg  

but I love the creative way of looking. Yeah, because funnily enough, you know, when I, I was single, and nomadic and I wanted freedom. And so when I first started, and whenever my partner, he had a nine to five in London. So I actually sort of intentionally then crafted my work around that back into Monday, Friday nine to five because otherwise I wouldn’t see him evenings and weekends. And then, you know, when I had a newborn baby that then shifted things now we’ve moved out of London that’s shifted things, et cetera, Cetera now, but my daughter’s starting school, there’s just things so some of it is driven by myself. So I’m my partner, and so on. But it’s it’s so there’s no sort of magic. You know, the moment I’m working three days a week, it’s going to probably be a four day weekend, September. I love this, like had someone say they did a What did they call? I want to say yeah, nine day fortnight, I guess a bit like you said, so you do it every other Friday off, which she thought worked really well, because you’re quite around some Fridays. So nobody really noticed. But you still have the free day and you don’t get you know, there’s just so I think this is what’s so interesting. There’s so many frameworks and the nine to five is just a very outdated construct, whether we’re working for ourselves and an organization just doesn’t really, you know, correspond to anyone’s reality whether you’re in medical profession, whether you’re a parent, whether you’re aging, you know, whatever it is. So it’s always interesting to hear the different versions that exist.

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yeah, and I think that my schedule molds like you and you had a baby, you met your partner, my molds around the my client needs. So Friday is a light meeting for clients. They generally just like want to get through their work and get out. And Mondays are the sort of drinking from the firehose, so my Mondays are more of a planning day and I’ll try to take Friday’s to do more of a thinking day. And then Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, dive deep go hard. Yeah, but I Like I ran a marathon last December, I would, you know, I block off mornings to do long runs or just different kind of exercise. So just, yeah, I mean, it’s the flexibility, right? It’s my schedule. I decide, like, cool. We have a bunch. I think we have four or five long day weekends, September, October, November, January, I’m taking a couple of weeks off. So yeah, just that. I don’t have to beg anyone to give me hours back. I don’t have to ask permission to get time off like, and I’ve been on. We’ve been on holidays where I’ve done like keynote for 150 people like virtual. I was the only virtual one. Everybody else was in a big ballroom and university campus. And it’s just like, oh, let me just dip out of the pool quickly do my hair, jump on and then finish up? Oh, let me go back in the pool. Right? Just like how cool is that?

 

Anna Lundberg  

cycle. And I love how you just casually dropped in that you’ve run a marathon as well. So it definitely sounds like you’ve got some good balance there. In and out of the pool running training a lot of hours for a marathon. I’ve not managed a full marathon. So that’s fantastic. What else? Did you other sort of hobbies and things? How else do you play in the week apart from you know, the work and exercise? Yeah,

 

Kerri Burchill  

I mean, honestly, I’m asleep hog. We go to bed at like eight or nine, eight, it’s probably read for an hour of just whatever stuff. So during the week, we have a great neighborhood. I can’t, I can’t say enough about my neighbors and how awesome they are. So well. We’ll connect at the local watering hole, or walk our dogs together or just I don’t know, have spontaneous dinners together. Just kind of like potluck throw stuff together. Yeah.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Well, it sounds very, I was gonna say then, but it sounds you know, it sounds like you’re very clear and confident and you’re doing work that works for the clients, but you’re also doing your own terms. It sounds it sounds like you’ve created something really, really great. And what’s next for you now Carrie, what are you working towards in the coming months and years?

 

Kerri Burchill  

I feel so I just do feel so lucky. Yeah, and this is where the imposter like can sneak in right? Because July August is just slower for my clients. And then I can think, oh, I don’t have new ones. Oh, what you know, and just know it’s, it’s gonna I keep if I keep serving, it will keep growing like I just know that right? That’s been the mantra. So future future, I have leaned into the speaking thing a little more than planned, which is great. But I am increasing my praise because I don’t want to just do it as much as I was. I mean, I had some days where I’m like four days six flights, you know to different places just crazy. That’s not fun. So probably some more speaking but in more select areas. And then I’m publishing this book leading out of the asshole trap HSK that should be on the Yeah, on the stands late December. And I think that will drum up some other opportunities. So yeah, well like again if you’re open so I didn’t tell you this backstory I have this other saying if you’re open you’ll see it which came from my grandmother who turns 100 for this month, and her boyfriend who said like his sort of life advice was if you’re open you’ll see it so I have the book I have some speaking obviously the ongoing work with clients. I don’t know where that work is going to take me but I know if I’m open I’ll see it.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Oh, I love that that’s just such a beautiful succinct way to put it now hold his boyfriend is he also older and wiser as a younger gentleman has

 

Kerri Burchill  

to weigh in? Oh nine I think yeah, grandma. Bless her. She was with them. And it was not fun but they were out walking, you know, go into the local coffee shop. Like just cool. Yeah, because when you’re that old you’re just used to people dying on your grandma’s a trooper for sure.

 

Anna Lundberg  

She’s amazing. And and the book, of course will be an amazing, you know, business card and credibility builder on top of what you have. So expect some more speaking back, Harry, I’m afraid you might do some more speaking there with a book coming as well. But that’s super exciting. What an achievement. Thank you. So we’ll link to that in due course when it comes to where can we find you in the meantime?

 

Kerri Burchill  

Yep, carry virtual.com kriburchil.com. You can find me on Facebook and LinkedIn and Instagram. And I have weekly emails if anybody’s interested in signing up for that stuff. Or of course, contracting with me to slow down to go fast.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Perfect pitch. Thank you so much, Carrie for sharing so graciously. And congratulations on everything you’ve built. Here’s to the next the next phase of your successful journey. Yeah,

 

Kerri Burchill  

for both of us. And for sure. Thank you. All right, take care. Thanks so much, man.

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