Episode 274 LinkedIn expert Ashley Leeds

Interview with Ashley Leeds

In this episode of the Reimagining Success podcast, Anna interviews Ashley Leeds who is known as the ’15-Minute Guy’.


In this week’s episode, Anna takes a closer look at the varied professional path of our guest. Ashley Leeds’ career is a mosaic of diverse roles, each shift reflecting a new chapter of growth and learning. He’s transitioned from the culinary arts as a chef to various roles in sales, coaching accountants, and ultimately finding a niche in teaching LinkedIn strategies.

Ashley’s story is not just about the roles he’s held, but the agility with which he’s navigated his career shifts. Personal milestones such as starting a family influenced his professional decisions, emphasizing that success intertwines with personal life choices.

This episode unwinds the narrative of a man whose career is marked by openness to new experiences—a story that many can relate to in a rapidly changing job market. As we discuss these transitions, Ashley also shares how he applies the principles of perseverance and authentic engagement to his current work on LinkedIn.

Through his practical approach to professional networking, Ashley offers insights into building a solid, recognizable brand. His daily practices and strategies on LinkedIn are distilled into actionable advice for anyone looking to improve their presence on the platform.

Join us as we explore Ashley Leeds’ journey, showcasing the importance of flexibility in one’s career and how valuable skills can be transferred across seemingly unrelated fields. Episode 274 is a deeper dive into redefining success as well as the practical steps to building a strong network on LinkedIn.

Connect with Ashley on Linkedin, Instagram, Website and Facebook.

00:00 An accidental journey led to a fulfilling life

06:28 Advocate for young people to work in hospitality

13:00 Success comes from unseen years of hard work

15:40 Focus on reaching the right audience authentically

18:40 Prioritise actions for greater productivity

22:17 Structured daily routine and availability for meetings

25:48 “Authentic content and personal branding are crucial.”

27:36 Value challenging situations and make new connections.

*Resources mentioned during the episode*

1:1 Coaching & Mentoring – If you’re looking for one-to-one support to help you achieve your specific life and business goals, Anna has a limited number of spots for individual coaching and mentoring. onestepoutside.com/coaching

Linkedin expert

Anna Lundberg:

 

Okay, welcome back, everyone, to the podcast. And this month, as ever, I have an interview for you today. I’m here with Ashley Leeds and we met at an in person event a couple of months ago, which is amazing. I haven’t done a lot of in person events the last few years, so it’s such a good energy. And I was really excited to see Ashley and of course invited him on to the podcast as well. So we’re going to dive straight in. Ashley, if I can ask briefly, and I know you’ve had many career pivots, so let’s have kind of your entire life story in about two minutes. If you can manage that, tell us who you are, and then I promise to give you more to dive into all the nuances.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

No, I can actually do it in two minutes. So I left school. I wanted to be a DJ, right, on Radio One. And I lived in New Key, so near all the hotels and what have you, and I ended up being a chef, worked as a chef, met my wife literally just down the road from here at a hotel. We got married, we wanted to start a family. She wanted to be a stay at home mum. And I was 100% behind us. So I came out of catering and went into sales, and I’ve spent 30 years in sales.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And over my career I’ve had 30 different jobs. And up about 16 years ago, I ended up selling software to accountants. And that’s where I got into the accounting space. And then five years ago, I ended up coaching accountants and bookkeepers. So helping them to grow and understanding all about the coaching. And because I had all these transferable skills from before, I sort of like, oh my goodness, coaching. That is incredible. And so two and a half years ago, I ended my job with my old boss and I was going to get another job.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And my wife said, you cannot have any more jobs set up on your own. You can coach accountants. So that’s what I started doing. But I had an anticompete clause, so I couldn’t coach accountants initially. So I thought, what else can I do? So I started teaching Linkedin, and that is just incredible. And it’s opened up so many doors for me that I’ve had a bit of news this weEk, and by the time this goes out, you’ll probably know all about it. All because of what I’m doing on LinkedIn, all because of the things I’m doing on LinkedIn, or because of all the people I’m helping on LinkedIn. So my boss, with her anti compete clause, did me a huge favor.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So, yeah. And here I am today on a podcast.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I love that. And I heard you say it a couple of times. You said, I ended up, and I always use that, too, because I studied one thing and then ended up in marketing. To what extent, at any point in that journey, were you super intentional about where you wanted to go and to what extent was it completely accidental and it was just kind of being open to opportunities and making decisions on the go, on the fly.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

100% accidental. When I met my wife, my whole life changed and there was someone else to care about. And then we had children, and then, wow, that just totally changes for me. Having my first daughter just made me realize why I was here. And so I’ve just put everything into being a father and a good husband and so just provided I’ve had some good jobs, I’ve had some bad jobs, I’ve had some lovely bosses, I’ve had some not so lovely bosses, and I get to a point with the role that I’m doing, and I thought, I’ve had enough of this, and I’ll go and do something else. It is all purely accidental, but I got there in the end, and I am living my best life and absolutely loving what I do and the opportunities that are coming my way. Different things are just incredible, and I love that.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And I suppose, is there a pattern throughout or now where you’ve ended up? How would you define success? Living your best life? What does that mean exactly for you?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So, success for me has always been told by my boss that I’ve done a good job. I’ve always been in sales, so doing a good job meant I earned a little bit more money because it was commission based. But I just like to do a good job. I like to see people happy with what I’ve done. I suppose if we spoke to some psychotherapist, there’s probably some trauma back in my life from years ago, and to me, success now is spending a little bit more time with my family. I’ve now got a grandson, so spending a bit of time with him, going down the beach and spending some time on my paddleboard, and that’s how I measure success. So I don’t have a Porsche, I don’t have a big flash house, but I’m happy.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And you seem like a very positive, resilient person. Have you come across any? Well, that’s a stupid question. Of course you have. But what have been the biggest challenges, I suppose, and how have you coped with, I guess, the ups and downs of these various changes along the way.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

I’ve always been a fighter. My parents divorced when I was young, so I guess I’ve always come through things. That’s probably where it all started. 1 minute your life’s amazing, and the next minute the whole family’s broken up and all that sort of thing. So maybe I’ve just got this survival instinct, but we’ve had challenges in the past. We bought a house up in Coventry and we moved up to Coventry and we moved back the next day because we didn’t like all, I’ve got loads of stories. This podcast isn’t long enough for all of my stories, but I think when you go through a trauma or something difficult, something out of the ordinary, something outside your comfort zone, and you get through it, you think, oh, that’s fine, I can do that. I’m not afraid to try things.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

I’ve renovated houses and I’ve done the electrics, and I’ve put in central heating, all things like that, that other people are like, oh my goodness, I’m going to get a specialist in. And so, yeah, I’ve done that over our lives and we’ve just built things and just had a go. Because I was going to say, what’s the worst that can happen if you mess up your electric? You could actually die. But they’ve got part P and stuff like that. So it was all checked. But yeah, it was just having a go, isn’t it? And I think that’s why I’m positive, because at least I had a go.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Yeah, wonky electrics may kill you, but I don’t think a wonky business plan necessarily will in this world.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Right?

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

So you might be slightly embarrassed by a not so slick video that you post or something, but ultimately, in the short term at least, not a lot can go that wrong. And before we get into the most recent pivot and LinkedIn, which I think is the most relevant, maybe in the context of this podcast, but I’m so curious about the chef part, and you mentioned transferable skills, just looking back on that, because obviously we talk a lot about office environments and it’s so clear that yes, I’m good at managing teams and I can present and negotiate, but what have you taken from the chef experience into what you do today?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Right, okay, so years and years ago when I was at school, the elder people talked about they should bring back national service and stuff like that. I’m now that older person and I reckon that every single person, every young person, when they’re at school or at university, and that they should work in hospitality, because if you work in hospitality and get it right, you’ll never work as hard ever again. Because it’s hard work working in the kitchens, waiting on, looking after people who are on holiday or going out for a nice meal. And so by working in a kitchen, you can cope under pressure. You become resilient, you become hardened. It’s hard work getting up at 07:00 to go and cook breakfast and then staying on until 10:00 at night, doing dinners and stuff like that. It’s a hard life and you have to do things really quickly. So there’s an order on for this, this and this, and then it’s got wrong, so you’ve got to cook it all again.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And yeah, it is crazy, but it really does teach you resilience and organization. There’s probably loads of things that it teaches you, but I think just the fact that you can just get up and do it again. So, yeah, I’ve never worked. When I came out of catering, my life was easy to have a really.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Difficult career at the beginning, and then everything else should be a piece of cake.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah, absolutely.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And with the LinkedIn, then, I guess two first questions. One is, how did you land on it? Because what led you to even consider it? And then secondly, what is it about it that works so well for you that you think is such a good fit?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Well, so there’s talk that there’s about a billion people on LinkedIn, so there’s going to be a few people that are going to need a hand, surely. But what I was doing in my previous role, I was working with an accountant, and part of my role, helping them and coaching them, we had lots of different programs, but I was chatting to this guy, and how do I get more leads? How do I get more leads? And I’ve been using LinkedIn for years. And I said, well, you need to do this on the LinkedIn. So I explained to him what to do, and he went away and met him the next week. How are you getting on? It’s all over. Zoom met him the next week. How are you getting on? He said, I haven’t done it. I said, right, okay.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So we shared the screen, and I said, right, here, you go here, and you do that there, and you do this, and I go, right, okay, so come back next week. Nothing. So I said, right, okay, tomorrow, you, me, Zoom, 15 minutes. We’ll just do 15 minutes. And what we’ll do is we’ll share your screen and I’ll point you in the right direction. And so there I was right. He started sharing his screen and I sort of like, right, go into LinkedIn. So he goes into LinkedIn and he’s like this on his keyboard and trying to put his password.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And I think, oh my goodness, do this as a shortcut. Do that as a shortcut. So I was showing him some things on chrome and stuff like that. And I said, right, you see this person here? And there was somebody with it. There was a van, a picture of a van and some words and stuff like that. And I said, right, you need to write a nice comment. And I came up with the comment and I said, look, here you go. And I just tapped it in the computer and he copied and pasted it and put that in.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And I explained why we’d done it. And basically when you comment on someone else’s post, you’re making them feel good. And he’s like, oh, that’s briLliant. That’s brilliant. And I said, how come this guy, how come you’re connected to this guy? And he said, oh, I do the accounts for their church. I said, right, okay. And we did this thing anyway by the end of that week. So every single day I went back in and we did a little bit more and we did a little bit more and a little bit every day.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So he got it by the end of that week, he had an order from that guy for 1200 pounds worth of business. And basically this guy sort of like, oh, thanks ever so much for commenting on my post. That’s really kind of you. And I’m glad you did that because it reminded me that I need to do something with my accounts for my van business. Is there any chance that we can have a chat? They had a chat, come up with a proposal, and he was now my client’s client. And it’s just about being visible and knowing what to do. And so when I got to my new business and I realized I couldn’t do what I wanted to do, I thought, oh, maybe I can resurrect that because I know it works. Because if you’ve got someone holding your hand every day for a week, you can’t fail, can you?

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I think it’s an interesting one on a couple of levels. First, in choosing the business model for you, because it sort of happens organically. You help someone and the problem just kind of arises. You might never have gone out thinking, I’m going to sell this service, but when you do it, you see that there is a need for it and clearly it works. And yes, you can really see in detail the problems that people are facing that perhaps you hadn’t picked up on. And then what was I thinking for a second point? It’s gone from my mind. I think in terms of the accountability, for me, it’s something I see again and again. There are so many within business coaching, whatever you want to call within sales coaching, within mindset and strategy and branding.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

There is so much information. You can literally now go to chat GPT and say, what are ten things I should do to do it? The problem is not that we don’t know how to do it, the problem is that we’re not doing it. And so this kind of idea of doing bite size accountability, the trainer I work with I can do, if I want to, a daily check in with her. We do a weekly check in, new program every six weeks. It’s that kind of, unfortunately, handholding, little hacks, little steps we need to take little accountability, rather than the big, hey, I’m going to go off and do a week long hours and hours worth of LinkedIn training. That’s not what people need, is it? As you said, it’s really anchoring it in your habits. That’s what’s going to make the difference.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah, and that’s what I did in that week with that guy. And so what I then did is thought, hang on, if I can do it for one, I can do it for more than one. And so that’s what I do. Basically it’s a 15 minutes a day workshop that lasts a week and then you’ve got the tools to just go and do it. And the thing is, if you do 15 minutes every single day for a whole year, that’s 65 hours of free marketing. Who doesn’t want that?

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

It sounds easy when you say it that way, but there are other things we have to do too, right? We have to create content, we have to do admin and accounting and all these other things and of course client delivery and so on. I suppose for you, because you mentioned that you’ve got these exciting opportunities that will hopefully be available publicly once this goes out, but I’m not allowed to hear yet. But I did a poll, funnily enough, on LinkedIn a few weeks ago to ask for those of you who think personal branding is important, why is it important to you? And 100% of them said to create new opportunities, which I think is interesting. So what are you doing in terms of your personal brand to create those opportunities that are now coming your way?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So it’s all about consistency, isn’t it? I think that’s the thing, we see somebody and we look up at them, they’re at the top of this mountain or getting close to the top of the mountain, it’s like, oh, yeah. Oh, my goodness. What they’re doing is amazing. But we haven’t seen all the blood, sweat and tears that they’ve been doing for the years before. And that’s the thing. It looks like someone’s an overnight success, but you haven’t seen what they’ve done before. And I think we forget all of that. And when I turn around to people and say, look, just stop a second and look behind you to see how far you’ve actually come yourself, because you’re ahead of a load of other people and a load of other people are looking up to you and thinking, oh, my goodness, that’s amazing.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And it’s just making sure that you keep moving forward. So what am I doing for my personal brand? I’m showing up in places, going on podcasts and things like that. I always wear a yellow T shirt. I’ve got on my branding, on my photo, on LinkedIn, I’ve got a yellow background, and I use the same yellow background on my Zoom, on my Instagram, on all my socials, even on my volunteer badge. It’s the same image and it’s just simple things like that. And you see somebody and they got an image that they’re doing that and they got an image and there was somebody else and then an image and it’s sort of like, no, you need to be on brand all the time. That’s what I do.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

It’s such a clustered environment, isn’t it? And we’re overthinking it so much thinking. We have to show up in a different way, new ideas all the time, new messages, different pictures, and it’s just confusing people. Or worse, they’re just indifferent. They’re not even noticing it.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah. You look at some of the big logos that we all know, Apple, McDonald’s, British Airways, these big brands, they’ve been the same for years. They don’t go changing them.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Well, they do, but then there’s uproar, isn’t there? For me, I was quite traditional BA, had this very slick straight thing and then went all wibble wobble with the ribbon thing. But then we’ve accepted that eventually, too. So it’s okay.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

It’s all about being consistent and making sure that you do that. It’s a hassle making sure. I’ve always got a yellow T shirt. No, it’s not. Have a few. Make sure you’ve got them on hangers inside your shed. You just get into that way of thinking.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Yeah, I did actually have someone say to me, oh, I’ve seen you around, and I’m wearing yellow in all my photos, but I’m afraid I haven’t gone as far as wearing it on all the videos and things, only in the photo profiles and things. And one of the other mistakes I think people are making is that we’re comparing ourselves to the wrong thing. As you said, I can compare myself to. To someone who’s ten years ahead. And of course, you haven’t seen, as you said, the blood, sweat and tears. You have no idea what they’re doing behind the scenes or even actually, if they’re successful. You’re just seeing sort of the polished image. But I also see there are some really big name viral people who are getting millions of views on their posts and so on.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And I have to stop myself and say, hang on a second, am I trying to be a viral creator or am I trying to run a profitable business where I have a respected brand among the people who need to know who I am and what I do? Right. And I think that’s where we go, oh, I’ve got to get thousands of views and likes and sales like, no, you actually don’t. You need to get in front of the right people with the right message. And the example you gave of your client there, it was that guy with a van who needed to know it’s not reaching 20 million people around the world with some inspirational quote that has no relevance to your business, and so on. I think sometimes we get a bit greedy and also a bit lost as to what success looks like for us from the personal brand, from the LinkedIn perspective as well.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah. You see someone like Steve Barlow with God knows how many followers, and he’s like, oh, my know, I’m never going to be like that. You will be one day. But you don’t need to be that big, as long as you’ve got enough clients and enough people seeing you. But if you make sure that your brand is relatable, then people start recommending you, even though they don’t need your services, they see you as the experts. Oh, if you want to speak to Someone who knows LinkedIn, you need to speak to Ashley, the guy with the yellow. And that’s what happens. So people start talking.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

It’s getting people talking about you. So being consistent, that’s all you need to be.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And are you still spending 50 minutes a day on LinkedIn, or do you spend more now, given that it’s sort of your bread and butter.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

It’s my job. I have to be there. But the thing is, right, I probably was only doing 50 minutes a day, but as soon as I started seeing that this works and this works and that doesn’t work and what have you. I think the biggest thing with anything that you do in life is showing up and putting the right effort in. And you see a lot of people going down the gym, don’t you? Okay. And they drive to the gym, which makes me laugh, and they got all their fancy, fancy stuff on and they go and jump on this machine and that machine and have a personal trainer, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. But it’s consistency. I’ve got something to show you.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

I do this as part of my training as well, but I’m holding up to the screen a piece of card with loads of numbers on it. And basically a guy that is into crossfit turned around to me and sort of like, didn’t berate me for all of my walking, but I used to walk 15,000 steps every single day. But that was the only exercise I did, which, compared to the average person, is absolutely fine. But there’s no muscle strengthening. And I’ve got a three year old grandson. I want to be able to chase him down the beach. I want to be able to play in the sea with him. And when he starts kicking the ball, I want to be able to play football with him.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

So this guy turned around and said that you need to do 100 sit ups, press ups every day. And I’ve also added some resistant bands. So basically what I do is every single day I come in my shed and I do 100 sit ups and I do 100 press ups and I do me 100 stretches. And that’s all because I write it down and I’ve got the discipline to do that. It’s in my psyche now. It’s a habit. And so I feel fitter. I can chase my grandson and stuff like that.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And it’s just making sure that you’re doing the things that are going to move the needle forward. So I could go to the gym and probably spend an awful lot, definitely spend an awful lot more money, but not spend it as wisely as I’m spending it, my time as wisely as I’m spending it here. So I come in and I get it done because when we go to the gym, it’s raining, so we’re not going to go out or this has happened and we’re not going to go and whatever it is, because I write that down every single day I do it. And I had a really busy weekend and last thing I wanted to do this morning was 100 sit ups. But I did it because I’ve written it down.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I think it’s knowing yourself and knowing what you’re trying to achieve. The consistency is so huge. I do go to the gym and I do drive because it’s far away, but that works for me. And then we take the kids swimming and I’ve got the program and stuff, so you need to find the way that works for you. And it’s a beautifully sunny day here, too. My favorite thing to do is running, which, yes, in the rain is not so fun. I got caught in the hail the other day, so there you go. But I’ve now got that routine and I love it.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I hear you saying you want to play with your grandson. It’s my mental health sanity thing is to go out and run by the sea. It’s my only time by myself. I feel like when it’s just me, fresh air, ocean, it’s like my whole reason for being. And that drives me outside. If you’re just like, oh, I need to get fitter or I want to lose some weight, or I should really be on LinkedIn, shouldn’t I? Then obviously none of these tips are ever going to help. And that’s where I think you need the habit. It actually reminds me of years ago, I thought I needed to do more videos and I was terrible at it and I forced myself to do a daily live on Facebook.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

They’re still there. Please don’t go and look for them because they’re horrendous. But I did a daily little live. Awful. But that just that little practice got me over the hump. And then since then I’vE been trying and stop me with the videos. Right. Any new habit, unfortunately, means getting out of your comfort zone, means so much more energy is required to establish that habit.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

But once you have it there, once you’ve got your sheet or spreadsheet or whatever it is that you’re using or tracking, then it’s so much easier and you almost take it for granted.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And if you do a live on Facebook, because I did exactly the same during COVID and I did it at the same time every day, so people were expecting me. So you can’t let them down. So that was another motivation to make sure you’re doing it because I don’t know what the stats are for podcasts. I think it’s seven episodes that people do, and then that’s it. But it’s just keep going, just keep.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Going, because everyone celebrates. Oh, I’m in the top 5% of podcasts. Like, yes, you are, because you’ve done more than seven episodes. I know that I’m in the top whatever, but it’s purely through sheer grit of continuing, isn’t it?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah, but the thing is, right, because you’ve done all of these podcasts, you know how to do podcasts, you know how to interview people. You probably don’t run from a script so much now, and it’s all those sorts of things, because I’ve done this and I’ve done that, and it just becomes easier. But when you did your first one, you were probably a nervous wreck. You probably put it off three or four times before you started.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Well, even working out of starting a podcast, you get so caught up. What microphone should I get? And editing and do I do it myself? And outsourcing, should I use Zoom or Riverside and all these things? Right? And yes, of course, once you’re doing it, those things aren’t even on your radar. So it’s just, I love coming back to what you said earlier. Just try it. Just do it. What’s the worst that can happen? And then before you know it, just close your eyes, keep going. And then you’ll wake up one day and you’ve done 100 lives or podcast episodes or whatever. You’re mentioning the exercise, you’ve mentioned your grandchild, you’ve obviously got your LinkedIn.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

What does a typical week look like for you? If there is a typical week, what are sort of your working hours? Is it quite flexible? Do you have a structure? You sound like quite a structured person.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

I have to have structure. I have to have structure. So I come in in the morning between five and six, smash my exercises at the park, do a bit of yoga, and then I come in, I do a bit on LinkedIn, and then I set myself up for the day. I have meetings with people, I do training, I do one to one. So I do all of that. And I’ve got a calendar link, so you can book a time with me whenever you like, as long as it’s all day Monday, but before lunch every other day. And I don’t take any meetings in the afternoon. So when I’m talking with my clients and they need a meeting, I’ve got room to put them in the afternoon.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Some afternoons I could just turn around and go, let’s get on the beach. But then I turn around and go, right, I’m doing this. And so I block out time in my diary in the afternoon, and that’s for writing my book or creating a new course or whatever it is like that. So, yeah, that’s how it works. And then every month or so, I do my workshop. So there’s the build up for that and the week long and the backing up and stuff like that. So, yeah, it’s all good fun. And then I’ve got a couple of regular clients that I meet with on a regular basis as well, so, yeah, and it keeps me busy and it’s good fun.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And I do my two lives every week as well. So that’s Tuesday and Wednesday taken care of.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

And I suppose I can’t let you go without asking you what is one step, I suppose if you can limit to that one thing, if somebody is, let’s break it down to two things. One, if they’re not even on LinkedIn, they’ve never dared to post anything. What should they do? And the second is, maybe we’re already on there, we’re doing stuff. How could we take it to the next level?

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Right? Okay. And this is the thing, everybody thinks it’s all about creating content. The first thing is understanding what LinkedIn is. Okay, think of LinkedIn as a networking event. So we met at a real life networking event. Yeah. We all went there. We all said hello, we had to get dressed, we had to look smart, we had to go into a room, and it was a travel to get there.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

And for me, it was a couple of hours. It was pretty similar for you, wasn’t it? And then we were there for a couple of hours and what have you. That’s a networking meeting. We had a quick chat and we had a little natter that’s like commenting on a post. So John and I can’t remember the other guy’s name. They got up and said a few words. They were like, creating the content, but we were commenting on all the posts, hi, how are you? We’ve made a connection and stuff like that. And so while we were there, we started to get to know each other, and then we started to like each other.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah. Next time we meet at the time after we say, oh, I definitely trust you, and you recommend you this, and we start building up that trust, and that’s what we do on LinkedIn. So it’s going in, showing up, being regular, being helpful with your comments, and letting people see who you are and just sharing your personality. I did some filming with a guy on Thursday, and I’ve met him a couple of times, but we’ve never really had a decent chat. And so we were waiting for the cameraman to set up and goodness as well. So we were just chatting away and he said, you are just like you in real life, you are just like what you are on LinkedIn. And that is a compliment because.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Love it.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

It’s just being authentic. And I don’t know about you, but every morning I get up, I am me. And so it’s not difficult to be authentic. And so many people come onto LinkedIn going, oh, it’s a grown up platform, I’ve got to be grown up. No, be yourself, just be authentic. So I think that’s the key thing, is show up, be authentic and comment. And then once you start getting that, then start thinking of creating content.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

No, I love that. I’ve always said that too. And it’s easy to forget it because I come from a content strategy bAckground. It’s all about creating content, and it can seem quite intimidating when you’re starting. And yet commenting, I strongly believe, is going to get you in front of the right people way more. In fact, at the beginning, especially right then, creating your own, which is hopefully a huge relief. And I love what you say about being authentic as well. I’m the same and it’s so important to me and it’s so much more manageable if I can talk to you and then talk to my partner and talk to a colleague, talk to a client, and I’m just myself and I think people are so put off by the whole idea of building a personal brand in itself.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Oh, I’ve got to curate and be polished and be perfect, and unfortunately, I’m never going to. If I had to have the perfect setup and nails done and everything, it’s never going to happen. So sort of, this is me and that’s how I get by. Whereas there are other clients and other producers, creators who have a different brand, and I think that’s what’s important. But I love that. So I hope everyone’s listening, get out there, comment, try something, and then be yourself and just try to see. It’s hard, isn’t it? But try to see it as just a conversation with people, even if it feels a bit artificial at the beginning. And then before you know it, you might have that next opportunity around the corner.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah, but isn’t that what it’s like at a networking event? You go to a networking event, oh, I’m a little bit old, but you do it a few more times, you go, oh, I’m a little bit more confident. Anna’s there again. Hi, Anna. How you doing? You go and have a little chat and you. Yeah. And you’re all confident. Great. So you’ve done that with one person, do it with another person.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

You’ve done that today on LinkedIn, do it again tomorrow. And it’s just a little step. When I started my sit ups and press ups, I didn’t do 100 on the first day. I did ten, and then I had to go to hospital, obviously. And then every day I did an extra one, and then I did an extra one, then I did an extra one. So it took me 90 days. So three months to get up to the level that I’m at now.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

But I got there and you have to keep challenging yourself. That’s it. Right. And I read something similar the other day because next time I went to an event last time, let’s say I didn’t know anybody and I saw you and it’s kind of uncomfortable. I don’t know him. And then you talk and it’s not uncomfortable, but I mean, it could be. If I was new to these conversations and if it was a horrible networking event, it would be very uncomfortable. But then next time I’d sort of latch onto you.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

You, because I know you and I think that’s the next danger, is that you get then into your comfort. Oh, I’ve done my big, brave thing. I’ve talked to someone and now I can relax again. And I think that’s something that’s just keep going, just keep chipping away, keep taking those little steps in order to build up over time. And that’s those 50 minutes a day that you’re talking about. That’s kind of keep challenge yourself and coming back full circle to your whole story. Just keep experimenting. Keep kind of.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Okay, this isn’t working. I want to try something else. Being open to new opportunities sounds like a successful strategy for you, at least so far. And it sounds like you’ve landed on your feet.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

It seems to have worked, doesn’t it?

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Absolutely. So, speaking of which, where can we find you? I’m imagining you’re going to say LinkedIn, but what’s the best next step to someone listening who wants to find your yellow face? I was going to say, but at least your yellow.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

I know what you mean.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

Brand somewhere online.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

Yeah. So if you just Google Ashley Leeds, you should find me. Because what happens is if you do a lot on LinkedIn, Google Love LinkedIn. So if you Google Ashley Leeds, then my profile is going to come up on Google. But if you go into LinkedIn and just put my name in, I will come up. I am the 15 minutes guy. I’m all yellow and I have premium, which means that you can message me for free. You don’t have to connect with me or anything.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

All my contact details are there, so just reach out. And if you go into my contact details, there’s a load of free know, learn, learn a load from me before you even come to pay me for anything. So, yeah, there.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

You know I can trust you absolutely. I love that. It’s a great search engine, isn’t I, unfortunately have a famous actress called Anna Limberg who recently had a baby, and she’s just completely dominated my search results. So I’ll be back there rebuilding, taking back my rightful place on the throne and Google results.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

That’s a shame. That is. Why don’t you put a middle initial in?

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I do have that on all my handles. I have my se. Absolutely. But obviously I want to own. It’s a very common name in Sweden, too. It’s hundreds of thousands of people, I think. So. You know, it’s slightly harder, but there you go.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

I’m determined to do it. I will climb that mountain. I’ll be back on top again. But Ashley, thank you so much. It was such a pleasure chatting with you. I’m really curious to learn more about you. I’m always open to new strategies and to get back on the LinkedIn, I was going to say bandwagon, and that’s not the right word, but back into the consistent routine. And habit.

 

Anna Lundberg:

 

That’s the word. I love that. Habit, accountability and just peeing yourself. It sounds so wishy washy, doesn’t it? But it’s so important and hopefully takes a bit of the pressure off as well. So thank you so much for your time today.

 

Ashley Leeds:

 

No, thanks ever so much for having me. Cheerio.

 

WORK WITH ANNA

Let us help you design a business and a life that gives you freedom from the 9 to 5. There are several options for how you can work with us. Choose the programme that’s right for you.

The Outsiders Business Incubator

A year-long business incubator for experienced corporate professionals who want to translate their skills and passions into a profitable and fulfilling business. onestepoutside.com/9to5

The Outsiders Business Accelerator

An ongoing mastermind for service-based business owners, freelancers and online entrepreneurs who are ready to achieve success on their own terms. onestepoutside.com/accelerate

The Outsiders Business Academy

A self-paced course for you to work through in your own time, to learn – and implement – the foundations of building a profitable business that lets you escape the 9 to 5. onestepoutside.com/course

1:1 Coaching & Mentoring

If you’re looking for one-to-one support to help you achieve your specific life and business goals, Anna has a limited number of spots for individual coaching and mentoring. onestepoutside.com/coaching

1:1 Coaching & Mentoring

If you’re looking for one-to-one support to help you achieve your specific life and business goals, Anna has a limited number of spots for individual coaching and mentoring.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE
Facebook
Pinterest
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You might also like

“Everything you’ve ever
wanted is one step outside
your comfort zone.”

Book a free consultation

Get on the phone with Anna to discuss your unique goals and situation to determine the best programme for you, so you can start taking action towards creating the business and lifestyle you desire.

Get a free assessment of your business

Download this scorecard to review where you are on each of the 5 pillars of building a life outside of the 9 to 5, and get clear action steps to help you fill the gaps.

We will use and protect your data in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Looking to grow your expert business?

Download this FREE Business Assessment to identify the gaps that are preventing your growth so that you can take actionable steps towards building a more successful and sustainable business.

We will use and protect your data in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Download the brochure

Find out more about our flagship mentoring programme for experienced professionals who want to translate their skills and experience into a profitable business that brings them more freedom, flexibility, and fulfilment.

We will use and protect your data in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Privacy Policy

This privacy policy sets out how One Step Outside uses and protects any information that you give One Step Outside when you use this website (https://onestepoutside.com/).

One Step Outside is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

One Step Outside may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes.

What information we collect and why

We only ever collect the information that we need in order to serve you.

Generally, this just means collecting your first name and email address that you enter, for example, when you request a resource, register for a webinar, or submit a message via a contact form.

If you are a paying customer, we also collect your billing information including your last name and your postal address.

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymised string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Contact forms

We use Gravity Forms to allow you to contact us via the website. We will use the information you submit for the sole purpose of that specific form and will explicitly ask you to provide your consent to allow us to do so.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Advertising and Analytics

Google

We use Google Analytics to track and optimise performance on this site as well as embedding video content from YouTube, and this means that your web browser automatically sends certain information to Google. This includes the URL of the page that you’re visiting and your IP address. Google may also set cookies on your browser or read cookies that are already there. Apps that use Google advertising services also share information with Google, such as the name of the app and a unique identifier for advertising.

Google uses the information shared by sites and apps to deliver our services, maintain and improve them, develop new services, measure the effectiveness of advertising, protect against fraud and abuse and personalise content and ads that you see on Google and on our partners’ sites and apps. See their Privacy Policy to learn more about how they process data for each of these purposes, and their Advertising page for more about Google ads, how your information is used in the context of advertising and how long Google stores this information.

Facebook

We use the conversion tracking and custom audiences via the Facebook pixel on our website. This allows user behaviour to be tracked after they have been redirected to our website by clicking on a Facebook ad and enables us to measure the effectiveness of our Facebook ads. The data collected in this way is anonymous to us, i.e. we do not see the personal data of individual users. However, this data is stored and processed by Facebook, who may link this information to your Facebook account and also use it for its own promotional purposes, in accordance with Facebook’s Data Usage Policy https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/.

You can allow Facebook and its partners to place ads on and off Facebook. A cookie may also be stored on your computer for these purposes. You can revoke your permission directly on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/ads/preferences/?entry_product=ad_settings_screen. For more guidance on opting out you can also consult http://www.aboutads.info/choices.

Who we share your data with

We use a number of third parties to provide us with services which are necessary to run our business or to assist us with running our business and who process your information for us on our behalf. These include a hosting and email provider (Siteground), mailing list provider (GetResponse), and a payment provider (Stripe).

Your information will be shared with these service providers only where necessary to enable us to run our business.

How long we maintain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognise and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website, we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

The main reason for collecting this information is to be able to send you resources, updates and, sometimes, information and products and services, as well as for internal record keeping.

The rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

How we protect your data

We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure.

Where we have given you (or where you have chosen) a password that lets you access certain parts of our site, you are responsible for keeping this password confidential and we ask you not to share a password with anyone.

Unfortunately, the transmission of information via the internet is not completely secure. Although we will do our best to protect your personal data, we cannot guarantee the security of your data transmitted to our site; any transmission is at your own risk. Once we have received your information, we will use strict procedures and security features to try to prevent unauthorised access.

Links to other websites

Our website contains links to other websites. This privacy policy only applies to this website so once you have used these links to leave our site, you should note that we do not have any control over that other website. You should exercise caution and look at the privacy statement applicable to the website in question.

Changes to our privacy policy

We keep our privacy policy under regular review. Initially created on 18th November 2016, it was last updated on 23rd May 2018 to be compliant with GDPR.

Contact information

If you have any questions or concerns related to your privacy, you can get in touch here >>