Ep. 266 Matrescence: from army to consulting to motherhood with Katherine Hale

In this week’s episode, Anna speaks to Katherine Hale in the latest in her interview series.

”Matrescence’ is a word that is only just now coming to the fore in the last couple of years. It represents the process of becoming a mother, an experience that goes back to the origin of our species.

In this episode, Katherine Hale is sharing her journey…

  •  In her career from serving in the army to working in a big consulting firm
  • Embarking on the path of self-employment
  • And on this matresence process of becoming a mother herself

Whether you’re about to become a mother, you’re in the middle of this process, or you’re just curious about what ‘matrescence’ really means, this episode is for you!

You can connect with Katherine on her website Instagram and Facebook.

*Resources mentioned during the episode*

The Outsiders Business Incubator – A year-long business incubator for experienced corporate professionals who want to translate their skills and passions into a profitable and fulfilling business. www.onestepoutside.com/9to5

Matrescence

Anna Lundberg  

Okay, hello, everybody. Welcome back to this month’s episode, which is as ever an interview, and I’m here with Katherine Hale, who I met just a couple of weeks ago at a workshop very exciting for me because I rarely leave the house for work these days. It’s been a long time. And since I did in person, and I’m really enjoying meeting people, and one of those people is Katherine. So, Katherine, I’d love to start by asking you, and it’s a complex question. So so try to answer it briefly, because we will dig into the detail. But I suppose, give us a brief career history of what you’ve been doing in the past, and then what you’re doing today, and then we’ll dig into all the really fascinating pivots that you’ve made. Okay.

 

Katherine Hale  

Well, thanks for having me on the podcast to start with. And so my career started. Back after university, I went into the Army, and it 10 years in the oil signals, leaving on the communications it side of life, absolutely loved everything I did, while serving, deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. And they were both fantastic opportunities, but very realized very quickly in the army that I didn’t want to be married in the army or have children in the army. So I got to my round the 30, Mark. And I decided, well, I actually I’ve always wanted to work in the city, I’d always wanted to do an MBA. So I left the army to do a full time MBA, with the view of going into consulting. And I spent the last 10 years working for one of the big four consultancy firms. As a transformation director, a leading change and big large scale corporate transformations in the government sector. Absolutely love change, love leading change, influencing and supporting leaders through change. But realized, after the birth of my third child, a couple of years ago, that a life as a overworked management consultant in London, wasn’t really conducive with the life that I wanted to lead. And certainly living a mile an hour and a half out of London, with obviously, the travel time, the pressures of a relatively senior role at work, I was like, No, I need to do something different. So I’d always had an interest in business. It was my favorite subjects at GCSE, I always had an entrepreneurial streak. And I thought I actually have wanted to set up my own business. So about two years ago, I started thinking about what I could do what it would look like. And I realized that my strengths were in leading change and influencing and supporting people through that change. Coaching, which I qualified as a coach 12 years ago. And as a mom of three, I had a big interest in the motherhood space. And I learned about the word mitrice, since about two years ago, which is the transition from woman to mother. And I was like, there is a gap here to support women as they transition into that motherhood role. And I wanted to fill that gap and support women thrive, basically, both personally and professionally in whatever guys that looks like whether it’s a career mom, a stay at home mom, or a mom, who’s just, you know, reassessing their options. And so I started my coaching practice literally a year ago, this month, called Thrive and motherhood. And I support women as they transition into motherhood. Yeah, reconnecting with themselves, trying to reprioritize themselves and giving themselves time to focus on what they want and need and sort of help them better manage their emotions. And all the stresses and strains that come with spinning plates and juggling multiple hats.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Well, congratulations, first of all in your year, that’s amazing. I mean, it’s already putting you in a minority that you survived past the first year not to be too cynical about these things. But that’s fantastic and exciting to see where you go. And it sounds like you’ve made some really smart, intentional moves. I’m curious if we start with the first one, when when you went into the Army and 10 years is, I suppose quite a long time. I don’t know what what is the average length of time people spend serving usually would you say

 

Katherine Hale  

a full career is around is considered 16 years as an officer. But a lot of people do get out between this sort of six and 10 year mark, take it out because it is not just leaving a job. It’s a change of lifestyle.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Nick Yeah, because funnily enough, I worked at Procter and Gamble and the average tenure was I think it was like seven years and seven months or something that was the exact time that I left. So I was very average in my change. And but I suppose first going into the army, what was your definition of success? You know, were you planning on staying there for 16 years at the beginning? And how did you see that decade, I guess ahead of time.

 

Katherine Hale  

To be honest, I didn’t know I’d always wanted to join the army. I’m from an Army family. I’m the fifth generation to join and my husband serving at the moment. And I just knew I wanted to commission I wanted to walk up the steps at Sandhurst feel proud to serve my country. I am adventure seeker. So I wanted to travel, I wanted to have the opportunities that the army does give a young officer. And I didn’t think it was going to be adult career, I thought, yeah, the opportunities would be fantastic. And the leadership opportunities, obviously, you get are amazing. Leading a troop of 30 soldiers, you know, age 22, you don’t get that experience in in a civilian job. So I think it sets you up really well for the future and gives you a lot of skills and tools to take forward in whatever life that looks like. But I certainly didn’t have a long term plan. You know, I stayed in and I enjoyed it all. But the time was right when I got out and I happened to meet my husband, the year I decided to get out, but he wasn’t a

 

Anna Lundberg  

factor. Okay, now I see. And I’d

 

Katherine Hale  

made my mind up to leave. And I’d signed off as it were, the couple of months before I met him. That’s

 

Anna Lundberg  

interesting. These things often come together don’t know. So it’s interesting to see those parallel journeys, personal and professional. And did you see it as a kind of calling? And if so, did it feel tough to leave that behind? Just sort of, yeah, move and do something different? And

 

Katherine Hale  

definitely, I think it’s in the blood, obviously. So I think I knew, from a very early age, that it was something that I would be suited to and I would enjoy leaving any career is, it’s difficult and well, leaving any job is hard. But you know, leaving a career is is even harder. And as I said, the Army is a way of life, it’s not just a job, you know, you move every couple of years you move location, potentially, you suddenly move jobs every two years. You potentially move countries. So I think, yeah, mentally, it is a shift. And I was very fortunate, I knew you already pointed it out. But I am a planner, and I do like to know where I’m heading. So I knew I wanted to do an MBA on leaving. And I had a plan. And I think that made the transition for me very exciting. Whereas I think a lot of people sometimes get quite nervous by making a big change when they don’t really have a plan of where they’re heading to. So I I had my place of business school secured, you know, pretty much as soon as I signed off, you know, I was fortunately paid for the first three months during business school because of the way the Army’s you know, end of end of payment process works. So I Yeah, mentally I was in the right place.

 

Anna Lundberg  

And then when the next transition then so you knew you wanted the MBA and so on, and impressive big for consulting and so on. What about the transition, which you’re sort of midway through at the moment, that, you know, how tough was that in terms of going from something that on paper looks very impressive, prestigious, and again, you’re leading and you’re doing really well, I know, You’ve been very successful in this role. So you know, how has that change been deciding then to, in some ways, take a take a new risk better than yourself and go to work for yourself.

 

Katherine Hale  

And it, it was on my mind constantly, whether to do it from the point where my daughter was six months, you know, when you start thinking perhaps about going back to work if you’ve taken a fair bit of maternity leave. And it was constantly wearing around in my mind, what do I want? Who am I? All the questions that I thought were solely focused on my career, but actually, now I know what I know, around my true essence and the transition to motherhood. It was all about the identity split that I had, as I wanted to give 100% to being a mother but 100% to work. And fundamentally, that’s impossible. And therefore, it was a decision that I made as a result of that, that I clearly my role as a mother is perhaps slightly more important right now. Then, you know, my career in the corporate space. And it was, I think, a slightly easier decision to make for me because I had three children under four at that point. So they were all preschoolers, all with a clearly being very, very nice. At that age, but yes, it was very challenging because friends thought I was stupid, I think I think my mum thought maybe I was daft walking away from it clearly senior well paid role into the complete unknown. But I haven’t looked back this year, I’ve had no regrets. And I’d love the opportunities that I’ve now got that I, and the learnings that I’ve had this year that I wouldn’t have had, if I’d stayed in the role.

 

Anna Lundberg  

It’s such an interesting one, because I had the same experience. And I think my clients again, again, there’s moments of, unfortunately, people around us, they’re well intentioned, because obviously, our parents and our family and so when they want us to earn a living, and they care for us, and so on, but it’s, it’s really tough when others are sort of saying, Are you mad, and, and so on, but it’s very rewarding, when you then come out, and first of all, know that it’s the right decision for you. And that’s a powerful and then secondly, of course, when people then see you’re happy and thriving, and so on, they become very supportive. But I think it’s really hard to you know, I’ve talked about being sort of a good girl growing up, and we are so dependent on external validation. I’m always still now to some extent, you know, fall back into that comfort zone of looking for someone else to tell me Yes, I know, that’s the right choice and so on, you know, so it’s both scary, and so incredibly empowering, to make your own decision and to know that it’s right for you. I’m curious to dig in, because obviously, the red thread, also the parallel thread certainly has been then this muttrah essence, which you’ve mentioned your own and then supporting women. But can we talk about that? How How do you feel your definition of success has evolved from being I guess, young single in the army to recognizing that wasn’t where you want to have children to having three children under four and so on? I mean, it’s a big topic, and I’m sure you could talk for a long time. But in terms of through the lens of redefining success, I guess, how has that experience been for you?

 

Katherine Hale  

So learning about the dresses was completely life changing? To me, because it put the pieces of the puzzle together and why I was feeling like I was. And it may, it does automatically, therefore make you look at success and redefine what success is because you’re looking at your life as a woman through the lens of being a mother. And I, as a coach myself put you and have been coached by coach for a number of years, I did a values elicitation exercise all myself about 18 months ago, around the time I was sort of handing my notes in. And it made me really question who I was my core values, and therefore be able to wanting to live more and more in alignment with those values. And I think your values change, and I was living in alignment with my values, pre children, I love my career, and everything was going fantastically. But I think that big change has made me reassess my values. And therefore I am now much more intrinsically aware about what motivates me. And what I think success is because of having a deeper awareness of what my what my values are, what makes me feel proud, which you know, now is again, very different to what before it was being part of an organization, a very well respected organization being the army and a big fall. But now I see successes, being proud of owning my own business, making that a success. Being proud to be a mother of three, which again, I never thought I would ever be a mama three. Yeah, I had my first child at 37. So the time bomb was ticking. So yeah, I think success is the thread of success has always been around making the most of opportunities presented. But I think certainly now it’s much more about being very aware of what I want to need, both as a woman and a mother, and therefore being aligned to my values, perhaps closer than I ever have done before.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Hmm. I love that maths interesting. And I hadn’t like not even gonna remember, I can’t do maths quickly how old I was when I had my first but I think a similar age, I feel like I was a geriatric mother, as they say. And I think both my partner and I had obviously lived a happy, successful life on our own without each other. And without children, I think that transition is good, because you’re so I was gonna say, set in your own ways. And that sounds like a negative thing. But you really know who you are, I think, and you have your values, and you have your expectations and so on. But that can also make it harder, because you have really experienced, you know, I imagine if I’d had kids 20 years ago, it would have been so tough, but of course, I would have had more energy, I think, and you know, I wouldn’t have known difference in a way so while we never, you know, regret these things. And so I’m just curious, is that something around you know, when you’re, when you’ve had that independence, and you’ve like you’ve been traveling and leading these soldiers and having these incredible experiences, then the sort of transition into suddenly not sleeping and you’re trying to keep this little tiny thing alive and so on can be quite a stark contrast, I suppose. Coming at a later age in particular Yeah,

 

Katherine Hale  

it’s definitely I think it’s more challenging. Moving into motherhood later on for obviously, all the physical, physical aspects, but definitely you said set in your ways you are, you know who you are, you know what you want. And then suddenly, there is this huge turn of emotions and looking at yourself very, very differently. So, I definitely think that, that is a factor to the challenging side of motherhood, I also think there’s a big factor in my sort of story about, I’ve had a career in a male dominated environment for my whole life. So I have very masculine tendencies, masculine energies. And that’s just because of who I’ve been surrounded by, you know, 99% of my working life. And then suddenly becoming a mother, you know, in your late 30s, you know, all those feminine energies, you know, need to come to the fore, your empathy, your support, your kindness, your, your, the more softer skill set and strengths, which you in the workplace, especially when you’re in a male dominated workplace, perhaps don’t get a lot of valued. And therefore, it’s harder to shift in terms of your skill set as it were becoming a mother, the older you are, as well. One of the exercises

 

Anna Lundberg  

that I get my clients to do is thinking about, and it sounds a bit schizophrenic, but the different characters that are within us, and I sort of think that, you know, I can be and I need to be, I want to be the confident businesswoman. I am sort of, there’s still the adventurous hippie wander in there somewhere, I think he maybe isn’t always left out these days. You know, there’s maybe the central woman, the softer side as well, there’s obviously the nurturing mother, and so on. And, you know, when you talk about and again, thinking about success, how do you balance? And it’s a big question, sorry, to put you on the spot. But how do you balance those different facets of yours, you said that you’ve got them masculine energies, you’ve got the feminine, you’ve got the professional ambitions, and the of course, loving, nurturing aspects, too. So you know, as you said, you can’t do 100 plus 100. So how do we do it tell us?

 

Katherine Hale  

That it’s a really, yeah, a tough, tough question. And I think a lot of it comes down to self awareness. You know, I was speaking to a client yesterday, who’s realizes that her self awareness is very low. When we were talking about her values, and I was like, if you have very self awareness, you know, what you can do? And you know, what you can’t do? It can’t do? Because you thought you thought about it and and made time to think about it. So I think something around. Yeah, self awareness is key to being able to manage everything. And I also I think there is a big part. And I think it’s something why I like change is I have a growth mindset. And if you have a growth mindset, you can overcome, you know, failings easier. You see things as learning opportunities, which I know, you know, but you know, and I think as a mother, if you have that growth mindset, you can overcome some of the challenges that inevitably come with motherhood much easier.

 

Anna Lundberg  

That’s a great

 

Katherine Hale  

answer your question? Yeah, yeah.

 

Anna Lundberg  

So I mean, I take notes. I think the growth mindset is a really interesting one. Because of course, yeah, you we face these challenges. And we know there is a way it’s not like, Oh, this is so hard, I’m stuck. But it’s really looking as we do in other areas of our lives a space for solutions. One of the concepts I subscribe to is work life integration. And what comes to mind is for me that if I can be myself in my work, so you know, I’m talking to you now, I’m literally like talking to you about things that I find fascinating. Anyway, I’m talking about my work I’m talking about my kids is perfect. And I imagine it’s sort of similar to you anyway, because of the things that you care about personally, you’re also earning a living professionally, I’m able to do that. And that allows me my mom always says why we’re so good at transitioning, you know, from teaching a webinar to next minute, like being with the kids to next minute. And I think if we are being ourselves, our authentic selves, as we say, you know, the closer as you said, you can be to your values and showing up as a whole person that makes that transition easier not to say that that’s the right way. Because I know and I’m sure there are people in the army, and there are people in roles, corporate roles, where they have to be a very different different person, but bring a different energy that can work for them. But I’m just thinking out loud that I think what works for me and is the reason I’m able to be so fluid is because it all kind of works harmoniously is a bit of an exaggeration, but it certainly works, you know, kind of coherently rather than pulling in different directions because I think that would be really hard.

 

Katherine Hale  

I think there’s I agree with what you’ve just said. I think there’s something about trusting yourself as well though. I think the more you trust yourself to be the good enough mother to be To be the employee or the business owner that you want to be, I think it makes it gives you confidence to get through some of the challenges that inevitably have happened when you are dealing with all the transitions on a day to day basis that we as mothers have to do when you are holding a career down as well as as being a mother, so I think trust, trusting yourself as is really important. Yeah. And as we sorry, go ahead. And probably trying to ignore the judgment and the comparison that so many of us have as working moms, certainly. Yeah, just knowing that you are doing what’s best for you, is also I think, really, really important. And ignoring what people are saying you Yeah, with regard to how you’re bringing up your children specifically, because clearly, that’s something that everyone has an opinion on,

 

Anna Lundberg  

is important. And I think those two are linked by, you know, trusting yourself, of course, and then be able to shut out that noise. And then likewise, as we’ve talked about in your career pivot, kind of trusting yourself and not listen to judgment. The same thing applies with motherhood parenthood, because I mean, in business, we’re constantly getting you should be doing webinars, you should be doing group programs you should be doing. And then you’re it’s very easy to be swayed, oh, I got it, I’m doing this wrong, I need to do that. And I need to do all these things. And the same thing in motherhood, nowhere, I think, is there more judgment and different views on you know, not giving them Ultra processed food, and you shouldn’t be doing screen time. And then this, that me out there, and they should be doing, you know, there are kids that are school who are doing activities every day, they’re playing golf, and they’re doing dance, and they’re doing and I’m sort of struggling just to go to that one, one activity a week. So it’s very, it’s impossible not to compare yourself and certainly, in businesses the same right on social media, all we do is see very much in front of us, you know, online, offline, how other people are parenting, how the people working. So I think, again, as exactly as he said, the self awareness, trusting ourselves, and sometimes just kind of shutting out a bit of that and giving us the space to reflect on what we really care about what matters for us and our families is so important. So difficult, but so, so powerful.

 

Katherine Hale  

Yeah, 100%. And I think to be to thrive as a mom, I, obviously I talked about thriving a lot, I certainly think that these are things that you have to do as Yeah, trusting yourself and, and trying to minimize that comparison.

 

Anna Lundberg  

And speaking of I guess, yeah, thriving as a moment. And now with your business. I’m curious in terms of work life integration, you know, talk us through sort of, is there a typical day a week a quite fluid? Are you quite structured? No, you said you’re quite a planner. So how are you balancing? The, the two I was gonna say, but there’s four, I suppose work and three children with, you know, how are you striving for that balance? But how are you managing the different priorities in your life?

 

Katherine Hale  

So one of the reasons that I didn’t want to go back to my corporate role was that I don’t think I could have been successful in a senior leadership role on three days a week, which is ultimately what I wanted to do. I’d done four days a week when I went back to work after my first child, but three days, I thought, no, that’s perhaps taking it a bit too far. So I worked three days a week, at the moment, and that’s what I intended to do. So I get Thursday and Fridays with my two youngest, and have the opportunity therefore to you know, take them swimming, and I’ve done that every week since they were, you know, weeks old. You know, do the playgroup thing do the mummy stuff, which I have really enjoyed over the course of last six years. I do work evenings, I am perfectly happy with that. It’s my passion at the moment, this business I need to get it off the ground and working three days a week is challenging enough. But obviously, if you’re trying to set something up, then you know there is a lot to do. Say my husband is very thin for sympathetic and I’m happy working with him while he’s doing something in the same room. But I’ll sit on my laptop and an evening. And in terms of your day to day structure, I guess because I’m a planner I am I very much actually really quite enjoy having a 90 day plan where I’m complete control of it. So I have a 90 day plan, I review it and it’s down to a week by week basis. So I know give or take what I’m going to be doing each week clearly things come in that are different and you’ll have more client calls one weekend less the other week or whatever but but in terms of the business development side and the working on the business, I know what I’m going to be doing give or take each week and at the moment my plan goes up to Christmas I haven’t got past January but I’m on the final final leg of Vizio and that has been quite refreshing as a business owner because I’m in control. So I guess that As as much as my plan get, I don’t necessarily have a particular plan per you, per you Monday mornings, I will do this. And I know that side of it is fluid, it really depends on what I feel like you working on when I haven’t got the client calls, I can dictate it and I think find that very empowering and uplifting. And using your brain at the right time. You know, this morning, I’ve been doing a fair bit of writing, because I was in the mood for writing. Other times, I might be in the mood for you working on the website and doing technical stuff. But I can choose what, what suits me wrong there. And then in terms of what my brain capacity can deal with, which is

 

Anna Lundberg  

and is that flexible structure, isn’t it. And I think 90 days is such a good time, 12 weeks, whatever you want to call it, because it’s really sort of long enough to see the impact, but short enough to still stay focused, right. And then as you say, I’ve had I’ve gone through phases. And to be honest, I think it was pre kids, when I was able to do like admin Fridays and write content, Tuesdays whatever it was, and that can work for some and like you I’m a bit more yesterday morning, it turned out as you know, I then had a temperature and I wasn’t very well, but I wasn’t quite feeling it in the morning. And usually a productivity guru would be like, This is what you’ve got to do first thing, and I just kind of eased into I did a little bit of that, a little bit of that. So I and after a couple of hours, actually, I was sort of on top of things again. So I think it’s again, I think maybe the theme of this is coming back to trusting yourself. And and yeah, and it’s, I find it very hard for people to break free of the nine to five, maybe I don’t know, maybe you didn’t quite have that in the army. So it’s not as rigidly structured in your brain. But I think we forget that we are our own boss. And we can actually decide what we want to do three day workweek, fine, work in the evenings, also fine. Want to work on Sundays, yes, want to not work on Sundays, you know, it’s really up to you. So I think that’s a reminder to everybody that you get to make the rules, as long as it then is getting you the results that you want that it works for the clients that you’ve chosen to work with, and so on, obviously, then you can you can make it work for you and your family.

 

Katherine Hale  

Definitely. But I also think that having the plan, I’m very goal orientated person, I always have been. And I think if you have a plan and a goal, what you want to achieve every three months or whatever it might be, it really keeps you it keeps you focused, too. And I think as a new entrepreneur, new business owner, I think that’s really, really important. Because there’s so many things, you can be pulled in multiple directions, there was so much advice, as you’ve already said, out there, in terms of what you should be doing could be doing blah, blah, blah, social media pressures. But actually, if you stick with what you want to achieve, and say focus on it makes it a little easier. And

 

Anna Lundberg  

I think it’s really hard to commit and make this big decision for the rest of your life for the rest of your business. And if you give yourself okay, just try it for the next 90 days, that takes a bit of the pressure off, right. And then you can always, you know, work with this target client for the next three months. If that’s not working, you can tweak and so on. So I think that takes the pressure off a little bit as well. And I have one more difficult question for you. No, no, I’m sure it’s very much in your wheelhouse. But it’s just thinking about if someone’s listening to this, and they’re either at the cusp, I know there was someone at the workshop the other week who was pregnant, and he was just about to embark on this transition. And so either on the cusp, or perhaps actually and it might be different advice. Feeling this kind of pain or more the grief of kind of, you know, quick aside without wasting too much time but the whole butterfly metamorphosis, right, I would say that actually the cocoon is quite a painful process, you’re being broken down into protein soup before you can then reconstitute yourself into this beautiful butterfly. It’s not just that you go to sleep and Utah, your mother who’s you know, spinning those plates beautifully. So I guess those two scenarios if someone’s at the cusp, or if someone’s feeling Yeah, mourning a little bit who they were before motherhood what? What advice might you offer them or to reassurance or tips could you give?

 

Katherine Hale  

So, I think firstly, embrace change. But that’s hopefully come across of course of the last few minutes. Motherhood is a big change. And everyone goes into it thinking oh, I want to be the same person and that fundamentally you will change. I certainly didn’t think I would change as much I love my career. I feel I’ve given up quite a lot in terms of my career, but equally I haven’t because I have you looked at things positively. And seen motherhood as an opportunity for personal growth and development. And I think more people perhaps doing that would help them in those early stages of motherhood. I think the second thing is you’re not alone. All the feelings that you have around feeling isolated, having mom guilt, feeling overwhelmed because you’re juggling plates, you’re wearing so many hats, you’re feeling stretched in all directions. That is that is normal. But it doesn’t have to be like that there is support out there and understanding the word retreatants has As I said to be life changing for me, and I think the more people that know about that, it helps them in that in that transition and to normalize how you’re feeling. And get get through it quicker as well. You know, mothers can thrive, you don’t have to be stuck in survival mode the whole time. But if you understand that you’re not alone, and there are there is a community of women out there that can support you. A bit from local mums in the playgrounds to your family, to professional support, I think that’s really advantageous. Yeah, I think there’s two key things.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I love that you’re embracing change again, like growth mindset, and absolutely not having to struggle through it alone, I think is really key. And so Katherine, I think you’re quite active on Instagram. Is that the best place to find you? Where can we connect with you and learn more about you?

 

Katherine Hale  

So I’m on Instagram at Thrive underscore in underscore motherhood. I tried to post as regularly as I can. My website is thriving motherhood.co.uk. And you can find out all about my personal coaching, group coaching, corporate coaching, I’m looking at taking my coaching program into the corporate space next year as well. It’s all on on my website.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Perfect. Well, thank you so much. It was really lovely to hear about both the personal transformation and to dig into some some kind of thorny issues, I suppose. But exciting ones to around matriculants I think it’s a new concept for a lot of people. It’s sort of a paid to did you. Sorry, again, for putting you on the spot. But did you say that there was a time? When was it sort of invented? When did we first start using the web?

 

Katherine Hale  

The word actually only came into the Cambridge dictionary in 2020. Okay, wow. So it is a really new and the word originally was coined back in 1973, by a lady called Diana Raphael, who came up with the term doula, which has stopped loss very much, so it’s didn’t get any traction. Okay, the last sort of 15 years, and I, my prediction is that the word retraces will be as big as the word menopause. In about 10 years time, I think we’re going through a phase where health and well being are so much more prioritized women’s, the support to women, as a result of the pandemic, you know, needs to be improved, etc. And so I I’m optimistic that women will have a better understanding workplaces will have a better understanding, and there’ll be more support available over the coming years.

 

Anna Lundberg  

I hope so I’m just Yeah, it feels like a paradox, because it is it really is the biggest change you could possibly imagine physically, mentally in your life. And yeah, as you say, somehow, it’s because it’s so normal. Everybody does it. Almost, you know, it’s just, it’s such a natural thing. People don’t potentially sort of think, Oh, it must be. I don’t know. So yeah, it’s a very interesting one are definitely

 

Katherine Hale  

is deemed as big as adolescence. Yeah. And obviously, we’ve all been some of the challenges and that brings. Yeah, so yeah,

 

Anna Lundberg  

so just know. So again, I hope it sort of shone a light on that and been, you know, I’m sure practically useful to some mothers who are in that moment now as well and looking forward to staying connected and seeing, I know you’re at the beginning of kind of this next phase, but I’m sure being the sort of leader of change, you’re going to see many more pivots in the future, but really exciting. Thanks again for sharing your your career and personal journey and best of luck with the next phase of your business.

 

Katherine Hale  

Thanks so much, Anna, lovely to talk to you.

 

Anna Lundberg  

Thank you. Perfect, thank you. Okay, yes.

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Privacy Policy

This privacy policy sets out how One Step Outside uses and protects any information that you give One Step Outside when you use this website (https://onestepoutside.com/).

One Step Outside is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide certain information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement.

One Step Outside may change this policy from time to time by updating this page. You should check this page from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes.

What information we collect and why

We only ever collect the information that we need in order to serve you.

Generally, this just means collecting your first name and email address that you enter, for example, when you request a resource, register for a webinar, or submit a message via a contact form.

If you are a paying customer, we also collect your billing information including your last name and your postal address.

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymised string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Contact forms

We use Gravity Forms to allow you to contact us via the website. We will use the information you submit for the sole purpose of that specific form and will explicitly ask you to provide your consent to allow us to do so.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Advertising and Analytics

Google

We use Google Analytics to track and optimise performance on this site as well as embedding video content from YouTube, and this means that your web browser automatically sends certain information to Google. This includes the URL of the page that you’re visiting and your IP address. Google may also set cookies on your browser or read cookies that are already there. Apps that use Google advertising services also share information with Google, such as the name of the app and a unique identifier for advertising.

Google uses the information shared by sites and apps to deliver our services, maintain and improve them, develop new services, measure the effectiveness of advertising, protect against fraud and abuse and personalise content and ads that you see on Google and on our partners’ sites and apps. See their Privacy Policy to learn more about how they process data for each of these purposes, and their Advertising page for more about Google ads, how your information is used in the context of advertising and how long Google stores this information.

Facebook

We use the conversion tracking and custom audiences via the Facebook pixel on our website. This allows user behaviour to be tracked after they have been redirected to our website by clicking on a Facebook ad and enables us to measure the effectiveness of our Facebook ads. The data collected in this way is anonymous to us, i.e. we do not see the personal data of individual users. However, this data is stored and processed by Facebook, who may link this information to your Facebook account and also use it for its own promotional purposes, in accordance with Facebook’s Data Usage Policy https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/.

You can allow Facebook and its partners to place ads on and off Facebook. A cookie may also be stored on your computer for these purposes. You can revoke your permission directly on Facebook here: https://www.facebook.com/ads/preferences/?entry_product=ad_settings_screen. For more guidance on opting out you can also consult http://www.aboutads.info/choices.

Who we share your data with

We use a number of third parties to provide us with services which are necessary to run our business or to assist us with running our business and who process your information for us on our behalf. These include a hosting and email provider (Siteground), mailing list provider (GetResponse), and a payment provider (Stripe).

Your information will be shared with these service providers only where necessary to enable us to run our business.

How long we maintain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognise and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website, we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

The main reason for collecting this information is to be able to send you resources, updates and, sometimes, information and products and services, as well as for internal record keeping.

The rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

How we protect your data

We are committed to ensuring that your information is secure.

Where we have given you (or where you have chosen) a password that lets you access certain parts of our site, you are responsible for keeping this password confidential and we ask you not to share a password with anyone.

Unfortunately, the transmission of information via the internet is not completely secure. Although we will do our best to protect your personal data, we cannot guarantee the security of your data transmitted to our site; any transmission is at your own risk. Once we have received your information, we will use strict procedures and security features to try to prevent unauthorised access.

Links to other websites

Our website contains links to other websites. This privacy policy only applies to this website so once you have used these links to leave our site, you should note that we do not have any control over that other website. You should exercise caution and look at the privacy statement applicable to the website in question.

Changes to our privacy policy

We keep our privacy policy under regular review. Initially created on 18th November 2016, it was last updated on 23rd May 2018 to be compliant with GDPR.

Contact information

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